Gloucester Township Municipal Court

PO Box 8
Blackwood, NJ 08012
Court Address: 1261 Chews Landing Rd, Clementon, NJ 08021
Office Hours: 8:00am - 5:45pm
Municipal Court Judge: Honorable Nicholas Trabosh
Gloucester Township Municipal Court Administrator: Patricia Carroll
Cases: The Municipal Court hears all violations of the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Laws, petty disorderly persons, disorderly person’s offenses, violation of city ordinances and other violations of housing and construction codes.
Website: http://glotwp.com/department/municipal-court/
Tel: 856-228-4000

About Gloucester Township, NJ

Gloucester Township is a township in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township had a total population of 64,634, reflecting an increase of 284 (+0.4%) from the 64,350 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 10,553 (+19.6%) from the 53,797 counted in the 1990 Census. The township ranked as the 19th most-populous municipality in the state in 2010 after having been ranked 18th in 2000.

Gloucester Township was formed on June 1, 1695, while the area was still part of Gloucester County. It was incorporated as one of New Jersey's first 104 townships by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. It became part of the newly created Camden County upon its formation on March 13, 1844. Portions of the township have been taken over the years to form Union Township (November 15, 1831; dissolved on February 25, 1868, with remaining land chartered as Gloucester City), Winslow Township (March 8, 1845) and Clementon Township (February 24, 1903; dissolved on May 16, 1941, into Laurel Springs).

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How to Handle Your Citation

If you are issued a ticket or citation by a police officer for any type of motor vehicle violation (e.g., speeding, parking, use of a cell phone while driving, fender bender, injury accident, driving under the influence, etc.) you will have to deal with the municipal traffic court that has jurisdiction over the place where the incident occurred.

Accepting Your Citation

If you believe that the citation issued to you by the police officer was warranted, you do not have to appear before a judge in municipal traffic court. You only have to arrange payment to the court prior to the payment due date that is written on the citation. Note that failure to pay on or before this date can have serious legal or financial consequences.

Payment Options

Each municipal traffic court maintains its own calendar of hearings. If you decide to plead guilty to the offense, it is not necessary for you to appear before the court. You do have to arrange to pay the fine before the due state. You generally have two payment options.

Pay by Mail

Send a check or money order to the address printed on your citation. Do not send cash.

Pay in Person

Again, you can pay using a check or money order, although cash or debit/credit cards might be an option. It is a good idea to call the office of the appropriate municipal traffic court in advance to verify business hours and discuss the types of acceptable payment methods.

Pay Online

A possible third option, this allows you to pay your fine using a debit or credit card. It is not offered by all local municipal traffic courts at this time, so call to ask if this option is available.

Contesting Your Citation

If you would like to contest your citation, you must schedule an appearance before the judge. Again, each municipal traffic court sets its own days and hours of business, so call ahead to verify these and to schedule your appearance. It is best to call as soon as possible because dockets can fill up fast.

Failure to Comply

If you fail to pay your citation or do not make an appointment to contest your citation, you may be subject to other fines and penalties that can be imposed by the judge. These can include additional legal charges, additional fees, suspension or loss of your driver's license, and perhaps the possibility of incarceration.

When to Contact an Attorney

Personal Injury. If you or any person in your vehicle or any other person in another involved vehicle or a bystander believes an injury has been incurred during the incident, whether that injury be minor or major.

Driving Under the Influence. If you had been drinking alcohol or taking drugs (including prescription medications) in the period leading up to the incident or if you believe a person from any other involved vehicle might have been under the influence of alcohol or drugs at the time of the incident.

Substantial Damage. If there has been substantial damage to your vehicle or any other involved vehicle or vehicles, or if there is minor or major damage to other property (e.g., hitting a utility pole or tree, crashing through a fence or other barrier, or running into a building, etc.).

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